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Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Purpose Of The Presentation

I was listening to a trainer demonstrating how to talk for an hour straight, how to get all the facts out, how to entertain the prospect, how to answer objections before they occur.

That was ugly enough to teach me something important.

Try this: The Purpose Of The Presentation is to have the prospect change the prospect’s understanding of what they want. It can be deeper, more nuanced, or different, but you want them to change their understanding.

Why?

First, a recent convert is most likely to take action. Think about a reformed smoker making an issue about other people smoking. Likely to commit assault to express their new beliefs. Over time, I may develop sense of scale, but at the moment of realization, the new idea is the meaning of everything.

Second, if you are present when the prospect changes what they want to buy, everyone who came before you is less qualified to provide what is wanted. And, it would take too much work to requalify those who have gone before.

Finally, my experience is that people like to have a better idea of what they are doing. If they think I was involved once, they are apt to call to see if we can do it again.

All of that practicing and rehearsing I was observing at the beginning of the post now has the purpose of creating the new perspective. I believe that is accomplished in 20 second bursts, not 20 minute sprays, and the heavy lifting is done by the prospect.

What conclusions can you add to this post?

1 comment:

Jack Gates said...

Dick:

Too often we sit through presentations that are from the standpoint of the seller without regard to what we - as the buyer - may need or be interested in. If there is mention of winning the million dollar sales award, you are doomed to a wasted hour.

A good presenter knows at least two things - it's all about the buyer's needs and the buyer knows their needs - perhaps not what is available to meet them, but does know their current needs.

If the presenter can give a glimpse of a different reality which helps the buyer decide, a sale is made. Not pushing a Cadillac when a Chevy was envisioned - more like showing the advantages of the Chevy Coupe, Sedan, and Pickup Truck.

Good points. Thanks.